Why it’s Healthy to be Kind

Jan 14, 2024 | Special Features by Leslie & Kay, founders

Why it’s Healthy to be Kind

a special feature from Kay Ziplow & Leslie Zinberg, founders

We all know the golden rule: treat others the way you want to be treated. While this is an old adage we learn from an early age, there are a number of real-life benefits associated with the way we treat others. Science shows that as children, we’re biologically wired to be kind and we can further develop this trait with practice and repetition. Sometimes, however, due to outside influences and the stress of our day-to-day lives, we can lose this inherent ability.

Kindness and empathy help us relate to other people and have more positive relationships with friends, family, and even perfect strangers we encounter in our daily lives. Besides just improving personal relationships, however, kindness can actually make us healthier.

Here are some ways to improve your health through kindness.

Kindness releases feel-good hormones
Have you ever noticed that when you do something nice for someone else, it makes you feel better too? This isn’t just something that happens randomly—it has to do with the pleasure centers in your brain.

Doing nice things for others boosts your serotonin, the neurotransmitter responsible for feelings of satisfaction and well-being. Like exercise, altruism also releases endorphins, a phenomenon known as a “helper’s high.”

So, go ahead and volunteer, help someone in need, buy someone coffee or lunch, or try one of these ideas—it may be just the pick-me-up you need.

Kindness eases anxiety
Anxiety, whether it’s mild nervousness or severe panic, is an extremely common human experience. While there are several ways to reduce anxiety, such as meditation, exercise, prescription medications, and natural remedies, it turns out that being nice to others can be one of the easiest, most inexpensive ways to keep anxiety at bay.

So, the next time you’re feeling a little anxious, look for opportunities to help others. This could range from smiling at someone or calling a friend, to volunteering or lending your time to an organization. Even a small gesture can make a big difference.

Kindness is good for your heart
Making others feel good can “warm” your heart, sure—but being nice to others can also affect the actual chemical balance of your heart.

Kindness strengthens your heart physically and emotionally. Maybe that’s why they say nice, caring people have really big hearts.

It can help you live longer
You may be shaking your head at this one, but we’re not just saying this—there’s science to back it up.

According to Health.com, you’re at a greater risk of heart disease if you don’t have a strong network of family and friends. When you are kind to others, you develop strong, meaningful relationships and friendships.

So, go ahead and make some new friends, or expand your kindness and compassion to the ones you already have.

It reduces stress
In our busy, always-on-the-go lives, we’re constantly looking for ways to reduce stress. It may be easier than we think.

Helping others lets you get outside of yourself and take a break from the stressors in your own life, and this behavior can also make you better equipped to handle stressful situations.

Kindness prevents illness
Inflammation in the body is associated with all sorts of health problems such as diabetes, cancer, chronic pain, obesity, and migraines. According to a study of adults aged 57-85, “volunteering manifested the strongest association with lower levels of inflammation.”

Kindness may be the secret sauce to a healthy, happy life. Share a smile, make a donation, volunteer, help others. You will soon notice how satisfied you feel inside!

 

 

*Portions of article sourced from: https://quietrev.com/6-science-backed-ways-being-kind-is-good-for-your-health/

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Set the Example

Set the Example

a special feature from Kay Ziplow & Leslie Zinberg, founders

Your role is likely to change as your grandchild gets older, and you should be receptive to life’s swift changes that come with the territory. This is not only because your own commitments might change, well so will your grandchild’s needs and interests will change too. But what won’t change, is how your grandchildren view you. And sometimes we need to reel it back and remind ourselves of changes going on in family dynamics and make sure our behaviors are always coming from a good place. Growing and learning never stops.

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